The Carson Family

From Washington County, Virginia 
To Rockcastle County, Kentucky
To Jellico, Tennessee
To Davie, Broward County, Florida

 

 

 

James Holman (Holdman, Holeman)
Born: about 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky
Died: about 1886 in Crab Orchard, Lincoln County, Kentucky

 



James Holman (Holdman, Holeman) was born about 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky. He lived in the area of Brodhead and Crab Orchard, Kentucky, which are on the border of three Kentucky counties: Lincoln, Garrard, and Rockcastle.

On June 4, 1835 in Garrard County, Kentucky, James Holman was married to Martha Ramsey, the daughter of Alexander Ramsey, by Baptist minister Benjamin Polston

 

 

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The results of the DNA tests show that the descendant of James Holeman, born 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky is:

"very tightly related" to the descendant of the Daniel Holman who was born about 1787 in North Carolina, had children in Tennessee, and homesteaded in Douglas, Missouri;

"very tightly related" to the descendant of the Kenneth Holeman who died in 1871 in Upperfreehold, Monmouth Co., New Jersey who is thought to be a descendant of Robert Holeman, died 1709 in New Jersey;

"related" to a descendant of the Elias Holeman (1759 - 1827, Burlington County, New Jersey); and

"related" to the descendants of Thomas Holeman, born about 1723 in Kent County, Maryland, moved to the Shenandoah Valley Virginia, and then moved to North Carolina around 1750.

 

 

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There are three groups of Holemans in North Carolina:

1. Thomas Holeman, born about 1723 in Kent County, Maryland, who lived in the part of Rowan County, North Carolina that became Surry and then Wilkes County.

2. Isaac Holeman who lived in the part of Rowan County, North Carolina that became Davie County.

3. Richard Holeman who relocated from "banks of the Rappahannock" in Virginia to Timberlake in the part of Orange county that became Person county, North Carolina.

See North Carolina descendants

The three
"very tightly related" Holemans (James in Kentucky, Daniel in Tennessee, and Kenneth in New Jersey) are thought to be closely related to one of the above Holeman groups.

A possible explanation for the North Carolina/New Jersey connection is a suggestion (proposed by Holman researcher Randy Holman Schmidt) - the Virginia/North Carolina Holemans may be descendants of New Jersey Holemans. 

Randy Holman Schmidt has raised the possibility that two of the sons of Robert Holeman (Daniel b. 1689 and Thomas b. 1686) of New Jersey are in fact the Holmans in Shenandoah Valley VirginiaDaniel and Thomas Holeman of Virginia lived opposite one another on Holman's Creek. (See Wine Book, Life Along Holman's Creek.) One of them, probably Thomas, had a son named Thomas born in 1723 and he is the one who migrated to Wilkes County, North Carolina around 1750. Most Holman family researchers believe that Isaac Holeman of Davie County, North Carolina is the son of Daniel Holeman of Shenandoah County, Virginia.

Since the DNA results show that the three "very tightly related" Holmans are related to, but probably did not descend from, the Thomas Holman who migrated to Wilkes County, North Carolina around 1750, we need to be certain that all of the "sons" of this Thomas Holman are in fact his biological sons. Is it possible that (Daniel b. 1689 and Thomas b. 1686), when they left New Jersey took with them some orphaned Holman relatives?

 

 

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Thomas Holeman of Wilkes County, North Carolina

 

 

Two of the three "very tightly related" Holemans have ties to the Thomas Holeman born in 1723 in Kent County, Maryland and migrated to Wilkes County, North Carolina around 1750:

* James Holman (Holdman, Holeman) was born about 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky. He lived in the area of Brodhead and Crab Orchard, Kentucky, which are on the border of three Kentucky counties: Lincoln, Garrard, and Rockcastle. On June 4, 1835 in Garrard County, Kentucky, James Holman was married to Martha Ramsey, the daughter of Alexander Ramsey, by Baptist minister Benjamin Polston

James Holman, born 1814 lived in the same area in Kentucky (Madison County and Garrard County) as Joseph Holman (1746 - 1819), the presumed son of Thomas Holman, born 1723 in Kent County, Maryland.

* Daniel Holman who was born about 1787 in North Carolina, had children in Tennessee, and homesteaded in Douglas, Missouri.

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The descendants of Thomas and Isaac Holeman did migrate from North Carolina to Kentucky and Tennessee. Until the 1794 defeat of the Shawnee Indians, settlers from North Carolina, for reasons of safety, would have followed Daniel Boone's "Wilderness Road" to reach Kentucky and East and Middle Tennessee. The "Wilderness Road" followed the Virginia-Tennessee border to the Cumberland Gap, and then went northwest to Boonesborough, Madison County, Kentucky. Other settlers used the road before it passed through the Cumberland Gap to reach East and Middle Tennessee.

Leaving his home at Holman's Ford, Daniel Boone is thought to have passed through the area that became Watauga County, North Carolina. Watauga County separated from Ashe County in 1849. Ashe County was part of Rowan County in 1753, Surry County in 1771, Wilkes County in 1777. Ashe County then became part of the proposed "State of Frankland". It became part of Wilkes County, North Carolina again in 1792.

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Arthur, John Preston, A History of Watauga County, North Carolina with Sketches of Prominent Families, 1915, reprinted 2002. 
Pages 226-227 in a passage regarding Elk Crossroads:
John Lipps sold Land (first granted to Thomas Farmer in 1788 when Watauga County was part of Wilkes County) to Susanna Holman in 1799 (Deed Bk E, p. 241). Susanna Holman sold land to William Clawson in 1802 (Deed bk A, p. 534). William Clawson sold land to Ebeneezer Clawson in 1835.
[Question: Is this the widow of Thomas Holeman, died 1798, and their son-in-law, William Clawson?]

Margaret "Peggy" Holeman, born 1778 in Wilkes County, North Carolina, married William Clawson in 1794 in Wilkes County, North Carolina. They were in the 1800 census for Morgan, Wilkes County, North Carolina; in the 1810, 1820, 1830 census for Ashe County, North Carolina; and in the 1840 census for Johnson County, Tennessee. Margaret (Holeman) Clawson was living with her son-in-law and daughter (George and Helen Rowland) in the 1850 census for Subdivision 15, Knox County, Tennessee.

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Elsa Tugman, the widow of Thomas Holeman (1756-1833) [son of Thomas Holeman, died 1798]

Source Citation
Year: 1860; Census Place: District 9, Johnson, Tennessee; Roll: M653_1259; Page: 59; Image: 124; Family History Library Film: 805259
46 Profit John         64     1796     Male     North Carolina 
46 Profit Mary        54     1806     Female  North Carolina 
46 Profit Martha     12     1848     Female  North Carolina 
46 Holman Alisa    85     1775     Female  Virginia 

Source Citation
Year: 1870; Census Place: Meet Camp, Watauga, North Carolina; Roll: M593_1164; Page: 830A; Image: 744; Family History Library Film: 552663
54 Proffitt James         42     1828     Male     White     North Carolina 
54 Proffitt John           74     1796     Male     White     North Carolina 
54 Proffitt Milly          64     1806     Female White     North Carolina 
54 Holeman Asa         97     1773     Male     White     North Carolina 
54 Proffitt Martha       23     1847     Female  White     North Carolina 
54 Proffitt Jesse            2      1868     Male     White     North Carolina 

Source Citation
Year: 1880; Census Place: Meat Camp, Watauga, North Carolina; Roll: 986; Family History Film: 1254986; Page: 394C; Enumeration District: 200; Image: 0366
44 Davis Thomas     White     Male         70     1810     Self         Married     North Carolina     North Carolina     North Carolina 
45 Davis Lurany      White     Female      69     1811     Wife       Married     North Carolina     North Carolina     North Carolina 
46 Davis Emeline     White     Female     44     1836     Daughter Single        North Carolina     North Carolina     North Carolina 
47 Davis Frankey     White     Female     39     1841     Daughter Single        North Carolina     North Carolina     North Carolina 
48 Davis Viniah        White     Female     28     1852     Daughter Single        North Carolina     North Carolina     North Carolina 
49 Holmon Aley     White      Female    106    1774     Mother-in-law     Widowed     North Carolina     North Carolina     North Carolina 

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However, the DNA results show that descendants of the three "very tightly related" Holemans are "related" (not "very tightly related") to the descendants of Thomas Holeman, born in 1723 in Kent County, Maryland and migrated to Wilkes County, NC around 1750.

                                                                                                                                                              

                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                                                       

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Isaac Holeman of Davie County, North Carolina

 

 

Could Isaac Holeman of Davie County, North Carolina be the link to connect the three "very tightly related" Holemans?

* Isaac Holeman is thought to be the son of Daniel Holeman and Elizabeth Cathey of Shenandoah County, Virginia

  ** The Records of Rev. John Casper Stoever show that he:
       *** "married" Daniel Hoolman and Elizabeth Cartlay of the North River, Shenandoah, Cockel Town in Orange county in the Colony of Virginia (June 8, 1737)
       *** baptized Isaac and Rebecca Hoolman in presence of "the mother herself" [under the heading DANIEL HOOLMAN (Shenandoah)] Knowing that Elizabeth and Rebecca were mother and daughter, Rev Stoever may have assumed that Isaac was the brother of Rebecca.

  ** Elizabeth Holeman (daughter of Isaac Holeman) married Isaac Johnson (son of the Isaac Johnson who established a plantation at the head of Holman Creek in the part of Augusta County that became Rockingham County.

  ** There is some evidence that Isaac Holeman may not be the son of Daniel Holeman and Elizabeth Cathey of Shenandoah County, Virginia. One conflict is that Damaris Knobe stated that Isaac Holeman when he moved from Virginia to North Carolina about 1752 brought with him his parents who are buried on his own land. (Daniel Holeman and Elizabeth Cathey died in Shenandoah County, Virginia. Did Damaris Knobe mean the parents of Isaac's wife, Mary Benton Hardy?) Another conflict is the 1887 letter by Elizabeth (Holeman) Smith. She says that her grandfather was the William Holman who married Sarah Johnson and that William's father was one of two brothers who migrated from England.

* Damaris Knobe reported that after Isaac moved from Virginia to North Carolina, two of his younger brothers followed him to NC: William Holeman and James Holeman. The three brothers had land grants in the part of Rowan County that became Davie County (adjoining plantations).
  ** However many Holman researchers believe that this James was actually the son of Isaac, not his younger brother. James Holeman married Lucy Cook, the daughter of the Rev. William Cook (founder or the Bear Creek Baptist Church).
  ** However many Holman researchers believe that this William was actually the son of Isaac, not his younger brother. William Holeman married twice (Elizabeth Johnson, Sarah Whitlock).

* David Holeman (1777-1851) was one of the sons of Isaac Holeman of Davie County, North Carolina. In 1798 in Rowan County, North Carolina, David Holeman (1777-1851) married Rachel Frost (1776-1851). 
** Abigal Frost (christening in 1744 in Morris County, New Jersey) was the sister of Ebenezer Frost (born 1746 in Morris County, New Jersey; died 1824 in Davie County, North Carolina), the father of Rachel Frost (1776-1851).
** Abigal Frost married William Van Cleave (born 1743 in New Jersey) in 1762 in North Carolina.
** Abigal (Frost) Van Cleave was in Garrard County, Kentucky in 1800 (tax list) and 1810 (census).


* Isaac Holeman lived near Thomas Holeman (born about 1723 in Kent Co, Maryland) in North Carolina. DNA results show that the three "very tightly related" Holemans are "related" to Thomas Holeman.

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The Holmans in America
concerning the descendants of Solaman Holman
Volume One
by David Emory Holman, M.D.

Letter from Elizabeth (Holeman) Smith, written in 1887
* great-grandfather and his brother came to this country from England long years before Rev War.
* do not know names or where they landed.
* brothers separated. all trace of other lost.
* Number of children of great-grandfather unknown.
* Her grandfather was William Holeman
  ** married twice
  ** second wife was Sarah Johnson, relative of Col. Dick Johnson.
  ** lived in Surrey Co, NC and had nine children.
  ** better class. Lived on farm and had slaves.
* Her father was David Holeman
  ** Married Mary Welch, daughter of Samuel and Chloe Welch, a niece of Daniel Webster.
  ** married Sept 27, 1814 in NC.
  ** after marriage moved to Ohio.
  ** then moved to Prebble Co., Ohio
* Samuel Holeman, her father's youngest brother, moved from NC to be near them.
* Her father David Holeman then moved to Tippecanoe, Indiana. 
  ** Was visited by a cousin from southern Indiana - Ruben Holeman, who had been captured by Indians.
* Her father David Holeman made several visits to his old NC home.
* Her father David Holeman then moved to Peru, Illinois and then to Carthage, Missouri. Died Nov 19, 1874.

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It is interesting to note that many residents of Hopewell, New Jersey (and other areas, including Burlington) relocated to the part of Rowan County that became Davidson County, North Carolina. (The move from New Jersey was the result of corrupt government and land swindles.) These families left New Jersey and arrived on the Yadkin River between 1747 and 1755, about the same time that Thomas Holeman and Isaac Holeman arrived in Rowan County. Wagon trains moving from New Jersey to North Carolina would have passed by the Holman fort in Shenandoah County, Virginia.

 

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See North Carolina descendants

 

 

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Richard Holeman of Person County, North Carolina

 

 

Notes from Person County Heritage Book

* Mid-1700s Person County, North Carolina
Families move here from north - some stayed, some moved on to less settled areas
Carlise-Holeman-Daniel families followed this pattern.

* William Wallace Carlise and his wife Jean came to America from Scotland around 1730-1740.
Their children: 
William Wallace Carlise, Jr. went to Kentucky
Jean Carlise stayed in Person County and married Richard Holeman around 1765

* "Richard Holeman was the first known generation of Holemans to live in America. He originally lived in Massachusetts c1730, migrated to Virginia, and then settled in North Carolina." 

* Richard Holeman (son of Richard Holeman and Jean Carlise) married Rebecca Margaret Daniel
Her father, James Daniel, came from Jamestown, Virginia. He settled in same area of Person County (Paines Tavern) with other families from Jamestown. James Daniel was a member of Flat River Primitive Baptist Church (1786).

* At the same time that North Carolina Indians were being forced to relocate to Oklahoma, Charles Holeman and Richard Holeman (sons of Richard Holeman & Rebecca Margaret Daniel) walked to western Tennessee to hunt. 
In 1818, when the land between the Tennessee and Mississippi Rivers was ceded by the Indians to the US government, 
settlers already there were: Marcus Winchester, Thomas H Person, and Charles and Thomas Holeman from Person Co., North Carolina.
Relatives from Person County quickly relocated to Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee: Thomas Holeman; William and Jean (Holeman) Walker; and Elizabeth Holeman and Rev Doyle Pearson

* Thomas Jefferson Horner
George Horner migrated from Pennsylvania to Person Co, North Carolina
His son, Thomas born Feb 7, 1761 in Person County.

 

 

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How does Richard Holeman fit into the Holeman family tree?

* Leigh Holeman in the Person County Heritage Book says: "Richard Holeman was the first known generation of Holemans to live in America. He originally lived in Massachusetts c1730, migrated to Virginia, and then settled in North Carolina." No documentation is given for this claim and other Holmans were known to be in America prior to 1730.

* Eugene Holeman of Nashville in the Person County Heritage Book reports that Richard Holeman came to Person County (then Orange) from the area around Farmville, Virginia, and he came to Farmville from Massachusetts. Again, No documentation is given for this claim. Farmville is in Prince Edward and Cumberland counties in Virginia, west of Richmond.
[Note: The descendants of Captain James Holeman of James River, Henrico Co., VA were in King William Parish, Cumberland Co., Virginia. 
Also, the descendants of Tandy H Holeman (born 1695 in Tidewater, York Co., Virginia) and Mary Wagstaff (born 1700 in York Co., Virginia) were in Cumberland Co., Virginia.]

* Damaris Knobe in The Ancestry of Grafton Johnson stated that Richard Holeman relocated from "banks of the Rappahannock" in Virginia to Timberlake in the part of Orange county that became Person county, North Carolina. 
[Note: Christopher Holeman was born (1650) and died (1731) in Isle of Wright, Virginia.]

* Damaris Knobe in The Ancestry of Grafton Johnson stated that family tradition says that Richard Holeman is one of twelve children - seven sons and five daughters. Are these two of his siblings: Cassandra Holeman who in 1755 married Samuel Farmer; and Samuel Holeman who in 1818 married Jane "Jennie" Hall?


see North Carolina descendants

see North Carolina Related Surnames

 

 

 

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