The Carson Family

From Washington County, Virginia 
To Rockcastle County, Kentucky
To Jellico, Tennessee
To Davie, Broward County, Florida

 

 

 

James Holman (Holdman, Holeman)
Born: about 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky
Died: about 1886 in Crab Orchard, Lincoln County, Kentucky



James Holman (Holdman, Holeman) was born about 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky. He lived in the area of Brodhead and Crab Orchard, Kentucky, which are on the border of three Kentucky counties: Lincoln, Garrard, and Rockcastle.

On June 4, 1835 in Garrard County, Kentucky, James Holman was married to Martha Ramsey, the daughter of Alexander Ramsey, by Baptist minister Benjamin Polston

 

 

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The results of the DNA tests show that the descendant of James Holeman, b. 1814 is:

"very tightly related" to the descendant of the Daniel Holman who was born about 1787 in North Carolina, had children in Tennessee, and homesteaded in Douglas, Missouri;

"very tightly related" to the descendant of the Kenneth Holeman who died in 1871 in Upperfreehold, Monmouth Co., New Jersey who is thought to be a descendant of Robert Holeman, died 1709 in New Jersey;

"related" to a descendant of the Elias Holeman (1759 - 1827, Burlington County, New Jersey); and

"related" to the descendants of Thomas Holeman, born about 1723, who moved from Virginia to North Carolina in 1752.

 

 

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The region west of the Blue Ridge mountains was a part of the county of Orange. In 1738, the Virginia General Assembly passed an act establishing the counties of Frederick and Augusta. Frederick County was created August 1, 1738 from Orange County. The southern portion of Frederick county was taken in 1772 to form Dunmore County (later called Shenandoah County). It was originally named Dunmore County for Virginia Governor John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore. Dunmore was Virginia's last royal governor, and was forced from office during the American Revolution. During the war, in 1778, rebels renamed the county as Shenandoah. The act provided that the two new counties should remain part of the county of Orange until there was "a sufficient number of inhabitants for appointing justices of the peace and other officers, and erecting courts therein."

The headwaters of Holman Creek today are in Rockingham County, Virginia -- within a square formed by North Mountain Road (Rt 613), Winestore Road, Mechanicsville Road (Rt 614) and the Rockingham County/Shenandoah County border. Once in Shenandoah County, it flows by Knupp Road (Rt 738), by the intersection of South Middle Road (Rt 614)/Flat Rock Road (Rt 728), north of the town of Quicksburg, by Pinewoods Road (RT 730), by the intersection of Quicksburg Road (Rt 767)/Turkey Knob Road (Rt 698), and empties into the North Fork of the Shenandoah River near exit 269 of I-81, just west of the Old Valley Pike (Rt 11). I estimate its length to be about ten miles. Daniel Holeman's land was at Quicksburg, near the mouth of Holmans Creek. Jacob Holeman's land was next door going west upstream. Thomas Holeman's land was further west upstream, south of Forestville.

 

 

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Based on our findings so far, the following is a plausible story.

* Two of the sons of the Robert Holman who left a Will in 1709 in Monmouth County, New Jersey (Daniel b. 1689 and Thomas b. 1686) first moved from New Jersey to Kent County, Maryland

* The brothers Thomas Holeman (b. 1686) and Daniel Holeman (b. 1689) along with a young Thomas Holeman (born about 1723) and probably their slaves relocated from
Kent County, Maryland to Shenandoah County, Virginia in 1735/36. In between Maryland and the Shenandoah valley, there may have been a stay in Virginia, east of the mountains. (Some Holman family researchers believe that Daniel Holman was married twice. He married his second wife, Elizabeth Cathey, in 1737 in the Shenandoah valley. What happened to his first wife and any children? Was Isaac Holeman a child of the first marriage?)

* They built a settlement/fort on the east side of the north branch of the Shenandoah River, near where "Holman Creek" empties into the River. 

* In 1749, the Holemans resolved any deed problems with Lord Fairfax. The original of the five deeds below appear to be boiler-plate with each saying "...Assigns Proprietors of the said Northern Neck Yearly and every Year on the Feast Day of St. Michael the Archangel the Fee rent of One Shilling Sterling Money for every Fifty Acres of land hereby granted..." Apparently, after Thomas Holeman (b. 1686) or his apparent son Thomas Holeman (b. 1723) resolved any deed problems with Lord Fairfax, the land was sold to Robert Stapleton in 1749.

* Thomas Holeman, probably the son of the Thomas Holeman (b. 1686), was born about 1723 in Kent County, Maryland, migrated from Shenandoah County, Virginia to Wilkes County, North Carolina around 1750, and died in 1798 in North Carolina. 

* Jacob Holeman, son of Daniel, was the administrator of "Old Daniel's" estate in 1770 and inherited Daniel's land. 

* Isaac Holeman (born about 1725 and died 1808 in Rowan County, North Carolina) is thought to be the son of "Old Daniel of Shenandoah". This seems to be based on:

** Isaac Holeman was baptized by the same minister at the same time as Rebecca Holeman, the daughter of "Old Daniel of Shenandoah".

** Isaac Holeman and Thomas Holeman (born about 1723 in Kent County, Maryland) had plantations in the same area of Rowan County, North Carolina.

 

 

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Page 42 Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1742-1775 (Vol. II) by Gertrude E Gray, 1997

 

 

Page 40 Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1742-1775 (Vol. II) by Gertrude E Gray, 1997

 


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Abstracts of Virginia's Northern Neck Warrants & Surveys, Orange & Augusta Counties, with Tithables, Delinquents, Petitioners, 1730-1754, 
Volume One, Peggy Smomo Joyner

Land Survey: Daniel Holeman, no warrant, date of survey - 9 Nov. 1749 - 5 March 1749/50; 395 acres on Hites grant to Charles Robinson on North side Shannandoe opposite to where he now lives; adj. his own land & land surveyed for Doctr. John Henry Neffe, John Ruddle, Junr. Chain Carriers: William Carrol & William More. Surveyor: George Byrne.

Land Survey: Daniel Holeman, 9 Nov. 1749 - 6 Mar. 1749/50; 420 acres on West side of North River Shannandoah where he lives; adj. land granted Jacob Holeman, son of sd. Daniel Holeman. Chain Carriers - James Grimsted & John _____. Surveyor: George Byrne. Part of Jost Hites Grant by Bond 1735/6.

Land Survey: Daniel Holeman, 28 mar. 1750 - 1 Apr. 1750; 135 acres on North River of Shanando; adj. Holemans other surveys. Chain Carriers: James Grinstead & John Jones. Surveyor: George Byrne.

Land Survey: Jacob Holeman, son to Daniel; 21 July 1749 - 17 Oct. 1749; 420 acres on Holemans Creek; adj. Dan'l Holeman. Chain Carriers: Wm. White & Richard Marley. Danl. Holeman present on survey. Surveyor: George Byrne.

Land Survey: Thomas Holeman - no warrant, date from survey - 31 May 1749 - 19 Oct. 1749; 428 areas where he lives in South Fork Holemans Creek; adj. Mary Hill, George Brock, Peter Gartner, Wm. _____, Archd. Ruddle. Chain Carriers: Capt. John Dobkin & Saml. Lusk. Danl. Holeman & Peter Gortner present on survey. Surveyor: Georg Byrne. 

 

 

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Lyman Chalkley's three-volume Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County, 1745-1800 (Rosslyn, Va., 1912-1913; reprint, 1965) 
Vol 3, Page 320

Deed Book No. 6, Page 19.    16th March, 1750. 
Robert Stapleton and Catherine to Charles Stapleton, 200 acres, part of tract granted to Thos. Holdman by Fairfax 3d February, 1749, and by 
Holdman to Stapleton. Cor. George Brock and Peter Gartner, Ruddle's line. Robert (his mark) Stapleton. Catherine (her mark) Stapleton.

 

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Notes from "A History of Shenandoah County Virginia" by John W Wayland, Ph.D., 1927
* From 1720 to 1734 the area was part of Spotsylvania County. In 1734 it became part of Orange County.
* 1731: Jost Hite and others settle lower Valley. 1733: Jacob Stover's grants for 10,000 acres confirmed. 1738: Act creating Frederick and Augusta counties. 1741: Jacob Stover dies. 1748: Lord Fairfax hires George Washington.
* The southwestern part of Shenandoah county, called "The Forest," included the towns of Timberville, Timber Ridge, Forestville, Pine Woods, Pine Church, and Woodlawn. First settlers were Scotch-Irish, followed by Germans. The first settlers were there long before they secured legal title. 
* Daniel Holman was among the first white settlers. Lived about one mile north of Quicksburg. Holman Creek was known as such prior to 1750. They had to clear the forest, build homes, plant crops, and defend themselves from Indians - with no help from outside world.
* Confusion about the Fairfax Line (a surveyed straight line) that divides Shenandoah and Rockingham counties. For a while it was thought this was the dividing line between Frederick and Augusta counties. In 1738 the legislature clarified the location of the dividing line, but it was not actually surveyed until some time later. Residents and government officials were unsure of which county they were in - Frederick or Augusta.
* "The mouth of Holman's Creek is almost opposite the site of the fort, on the west side of the river."
* In 1757, Daniel Holman was the pilot in a survey with Thomas Moore for a land grant to the widow, Mary Hill.
* In 1786, Daniel Holman lived next to the Neff family (Germans). The "Main Road" up and down the valley coincides with present Valley Pike (Rt 11). Also, current River is not in same channel as it was then. There was a semi-circle to the west (across Daniel Holeman's land?).

"LIFE ALONG HOLMAN'S CREEK" By J. Floyd Wine
On March 26, 1736, Daniel Holman was granted a patent for 319 acres on the north branch of the 'Sherando' river. He was probably the first settler to acquire land along Holman's Creek as the stream was named for him. 

During the French and Indian War, John Hite, one of the commissioners for Frederick Country, in a July 2, 1758 letter to Col George Washington mentions the Daniel Holeman fort. (Letters to Washington and Accompanying Papers. Published by the Society of the Colonial Dames of America. Edited by Stanislaus Murray Hamilton.)

"Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement in Virginia: Extracted from the Original Court Records of Augusta County, 1745-1800," by Lyman Chalkley, 1912
Volume I AUGUSTA COUNTY COURT ORDERS. ORDER BOOK No. I. Page 12
* February 11, 1745. Daniel Holdman and Saml. Wilkins-- to oversee a road from Benj. Allen's mill to North River.
* September 18, 1746. Jurymen--Daniel Holdman, John Hood, James Armstrong, John Rutledge, Adam Dickerson, James Armstrong, Ro. Gibson, Thos. Cotner.

Notes from "Pioneers of Old Frederick County, Virginia", by Cecil O'Dell, Walsworth Publishing Company; Marceline, Missouri, 1995. Pages 469-471
Daniel Holeman
* Daniel Holeman claimed ownership of 200 acres located in the 891-acre Great Cave Tract. Part of a 100,000-acre grant from the Colony of Virginia issued to McKay, Hite, Duff, and Green. (Bond from Hite dated 22 March 1735/36 for the 200 acres)
* Daniel Holeman requested a warrant for 395 acres of Hiteís 100,000 acres grant on November 9, 1749. He had settled the 395 acre tract located on the east side of the Shenandoah in 1736. He received a Fairfax grant for the tract on August 2, 1750.
* Daniel Holeman received a Fairfax grant for 420 acres, containing part of Hiteís 200-acre conveyance by Bond in 1735/36. He had moved from the 395-acre tract and settled on the 420 acre grant by 1750. 
* Daniel Holeman received a Fairfax grant for 130 acres
* Jacob Holeman received a Fairfax grant for 420-acres on Holmanís Creek on February 3, 1749. This tract was located adjacent to Daniel Holeman's 420-acre Fairfax grant land.
* Thomas Holeman received a Fairfax grant for 424 acres on Holmanís Creek on February 3, 1749. 
Locations:
* Daniel's 395 acre tract: located between U.S. Highway 11 and Quicksburg on Shenandoah County Highway 767 which forms the property line. Interstate Highway 81 crosses the east corner of the property.
* Daniel's 420 acre tract: located on the west side of North River Shenandoah at the mouth of the Holmanís Creek, containing part of Hiteís 200-acre conveyance by Bond in 1735/36. This tract is accessible by Shenandoah County Highway 767 which crosses the south corner and is located adjacent north of Quicksburg, Virginia.
* Daniel's 130 acre tract: located on the west side of North River Shenandoah at Quicksburg on County Highway 767.
* Jacob's 420 acre tract: located adjacent to Daniel Holeman's 420-acre Fairfax grant land.
* Thomas' 424 acre tract: located about 1 Ĺ miles west of Jacob Holemanís 420-acre Fairfax grant land.

The Winchester-Frederick County Historical Society web site discusses the land dispute between Jost Hite and Lord Fairfax.
* In summary, Jost Hite first obtained the land in the Valley of Virginia by assignment of 40,000 acres from John and Isaac VanMeter on August 5, 1731. The VanMeters had previously secured their conditional grants by orders of the governor and council, dated June 17, 1730. The John VanMeter grant included 30,000 acres in all, located in the valley, enjoining the settlement of ten families. Broadly interpreted, the territory was a vast tract of uncharted wilderness--exceeding 40,000 acres--and did not require Hite to locate his surveys in a single-wide enclosure. He was allowed to scatter his settlement across the best and most favorably located tracts, leaving large waste areas ungranted. This settlement policy was usual, as such had prevailed previously.
* Lord Fairfax, however, considered it a "conspicuous trespass upon his proprietary rights," and the permissive policy of the colonial authorities provided him with grounds for accusing Jost Hite of "gerrymandering" his claim into a "shoestring," frustrating the future growth of the Valley settlements and making himself (Hite) and partners rich at the expense of others.
* On the first judgment, Fairfax won the suit, but Hite appealed, and the trial went in his favor in June 1784.

 

                                                                                                        

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Notes from:

"Records of Rev. John Casper Stoever  Baptismal and Marriage 1730 - 1779"
Harrisburg, PA
1896
* German born minister. Based in Lebanon, PA. Traveled down to Virginia.
* Original record "was written in German and contains many Latin phrases as well as a few English and French".

BAPTISMS

page 12

ANDREW BIRD (Shenandoah)
Bird - Rebecca, b. July 6, 1732; Bap. June 8, 1837
Evidences, John Gill and Sarah Moor

WILLIAM BREEDYES (Shenandoah)
Breedyes, James, b. Oct. 1733; bap. June 8, 1737
              , Hanna, b. Aug., 1734; bap. June 8, 1737
Testes, the parents themselves

RILIE MOOR (Shenandoah)
Moor, Terkis, b. Feb 15, 1731; bap. June 8, 1737. Testis, Catherine Gerlach.
        , Thomas, b. October. 1732; bap. June 8, 1737. Testes, Theobaldt Gerlach and wife.
        , Jacob, b. Dec. 1734; bap. June 8, 1737. Testes, Andrew Bird.
        , John, b. Nov., 1736; bap. June 8, 1737. Testes, Charles Ehrhardt and his wife Clara.

JAMES GUILL (Shenandoah)
Guill, Thomas, b. Sept. 15, 1728; bap. June 8, 1737. Testis, John Dawbin.
       , James, b. Aug. 1732; bap. June 8, 1737, Testis, Elizabeth Dawbin.
       , Mary, b. Jan 15, 1735; bap. June 8, 1737. Sponsor, the father himself.
       , John, b. May, 1737; bap. June 8, 1737. Sponsor, the father himself.

JOHN DAWBIN (Shenandoah)
Dawbin, Thomas, b. Nov 8, 1736; bap. June 8, 1737. Testes, James Guill.

JOHN HODGE (Shenandoah)
Hodge, David, b. Aug. 2, 1733; bap. June 8, 1737
          , Elizabeth, b. April 7, 1735; bap. June 8, 1737
          , Rohamy, b. May 8, 1738; bap. ___ 
Testes, to the above baptisms, James Guill and his wife and the parents themselves.

WILLIAM WHITE (Shenandoah)
White, Ruth, b. Feb 28, 1732; bap. June 1737.
         , Charity, b. March 6, 1734; bap. June, 1737.
         , Benjamin, b. in Jan., 1736; bap. June 1737. Sponsors, the parents themselves.

DANIEL HOOLMAN (Shenandoah)
Hoolman, Isaac.
              , Rebecca
Testes, James Guill and the mother herself.

JOHN LEENWILL (Shenandoah)
Leenwill, Lewis, b. Feb. 20, 1737; bap. June 7, 1737. Testis, Stephen Lewis.

THEOBALDT GERLACH (Shenandoah)
Gerlach, John George, b. Nov 22, 1737; b. June 4, 1738. Sponsors, John George Baumann and wife, Maria

page 13

ADAM MUELLER (Shenandoah)
Mueller, Catarina, b. Dec. 20, 1734; bap. May 1, 1739.
           , Adam, b. July 16, 1736; bap. May 1, 1739.
           , Anna Christina, b. Oct. 18, 1738; bap. May 1, 1739. Testes, pater, mater and Anna Christina Selzer.

MICHAEL RHEINHARDT (Shenandoah)
Rheinhardt, Emma Christina, b. Jan. 26, 1739; bap. May 1, 1739 Sponsor Anna Christina Seltzerin.

page 19

FREDERICH GEBERT (Shenandoah)
Gebert, Susanna Catarina, b. June 27, 1736; bap. Aug. 29, 1736. Sponsor, Clara Strubel.

NICOLAUS BRINTZLER (Shenandoah)
Brintzler, John Frederick, b. Feb. 17, 1735; bap. March 31, 1735. Sponsor, John Frederick Strubel
            , Maria Elisabetha, b. Jan. 24, 1738; bap. April 9, 1738. Sponsors, the above.

page 53
MARRIAGES
Record of persons united in Matrimony by me, John Casper Stoever, Evangelical Lutheran Minister in Pennsylvania, Anno 1730:

page 54
1735
August 16. Two English couples at Susquehanna River, in Creesop's house.

page 55 

1736
May 3. Two English couples at Opecken, in the presence of Lord Fairfax, in the county of Orange and in the colony of Virginia.

1737
June 8. John Hodge and Elizabeth Windseeth, Jacob Thigh and Mary White, Daniel Hoolman and Elizabeth Cartlay. North River, Shenandoah. vulgo. Cockel Town in Orange county, in the Colony of Virginia.

page 57
1739
April 30. Peter Maag and Juliana Rheinhart, Opecken in Orange county, Va.


[Question: Where were Daniel, his son Jacob, and Thomas when Isaac and Rebecca were being baptized?]

 

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English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records compiled by Louis des Cognets, Jr.
Page 120
Patentee: Francis Thornton     1300 acres On east side of Sherando         surveyed Feb 23, 1735
Patentee: Jos. Hite                     100 acres On west side of Sherando        surveyed Mar 4, 1735
Patentee: Daniel Holman           319 acres On north branch of Sherando   surveyed Mar 26 1735

Virginia Census, 1607-1890
Name: Daniel Holman
State: VA
County: Frederick County
Township: Rent Rolls
Year: 1759
Record Type: Rent Role
Database: VA Early Census Index
Source Information:
Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Virginia Census, 1607-1890 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.
Original data: Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.

Virginia Census, 1607-1890
Name: Danl Holman
State: VA
County: Frederick County
Township: Rent Rolls
Year: 1764
Record Type: Rent Role
Database: VA Early Census Index
Source Information:
Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Virginia Census, 1607-1890 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.
Original data: Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.

Heads of Families   Virginia     1783
Shenandoah County      Alex'r Hite list
Dan'l Holeman      2 white     3 black
Jacob Holman       9 white   14 black

 

 

 

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Information from Holman Family Researcher, Georgia Kinney Bopp (from the GKBopp Database on RootsWeb WorldConnect)
regarding Shenandoah County, Virginia:
* Several members of the Holeman family settled in Augusta County, Virginia, before 1750. On 11 February 1745/6 Daniel Holdman and Samuel Wilkins were directed by the County Court to be overseers of the road from Benjamin Allen's mill to North River.(1) On 2 August 1750 Daniel Holeman was granted three tracts of land:
* Grant to Daniel Holeman of Augusta County of 395 acres on the north river of Shannondoah ... west side of Cedar Hill ... land surveyed for John Ruddle junr. ... to the river side ... land of Doctr. Henry Naffe ...(2)
* Grant to Daniel Holeman of Augusta County of 420 acres on the west side of the North river of Shannondoah ... bank of the said river and at the lower end of the said Holeman's plantation ... Jacob Holeman's line ...(3)
* Grant to Daniel Holeman of Augusta of 130 acres on the North river of Shannondoah ... near the North River side ... line of said Holeman's other survey ... to the river side ...(4)
Although the land grants described the residence of Daniel Holeman as Augusta County, his land actually was within the borders of Frederick County. On 21 September 1763 the records of Augusta County describe him as a witness from Frederick County in a suit. (5)
Sources:
(1) Augusta Co., Va., Order Book 1, p. 8, cited in Lyman Chalkley, Chronicles of the Scotch Irish Settlement in Virginia (Rosslyn, Va., 1912), v. 1, p. 14.
(2) Northern Neck Land Grants, v. G, p. 393.
(3) Ibid., p. 394.
(4) Ibid., p. 395.
(5) Augusta Co., Va., Order Book 8, p. 235, cited in Chalkley, op. cit., v. 1, p. 109

Information from JOHN FREDERICK DORMAN, Genealogical Research, regarding HOLEMAN-HOLMAN-HOLDMAN in Shenandoah County, Virginia
Several members of the Holeman family settled in Augusta County, Virginia, before 1750. On 11 February 1745/6 Daniel Holdman and Samuel Wilkins were directed by the County Court to be overseers of the road from Benjamin Allen's mill to North River. (1) 
On 2 August 1750 Daniel Holeman was granted three tracts of land:
* Grant to Daniel Holeman of Augusta County of 395 acres on the north river of Shannondoah ... west side of Cedar Hill ... land surveyed for John Ruddle junr. ... to the river side ... land of Doctr. Henry Naffe ... (2)
* Grant to Daniel Holeman of Augusta County of 420 acres on the west side of the North river of Shannondoah ... bank of the said river and at the lower end of the said Holeman's plantation ... Jacob Holeman's line ... (3)
* Grant to Daniel Holeman of Augusta of 130 acres on the North river of Shannondoah ... near the North River side ... line of said Holeman's other survey ... to the river side ... (4)
Previous to this, Jacob Holeman and Thomas Holeman had received grants on 3 February 1749/50:
* Grant to Jacob Holeman of Augusta County of 420 acres on Holeman's Creek where he had begun a settlement ... south east side of a branch of Holeman's Creek ... head of a valley ... foot of a hill ... (5)
* Grant to Thomas Holeman of Augusta County of 428 acres, a tract where he lives on the south fork of Holeman's Creek ... corner to George Brook ... Peter Gortner's survey ... Mary Hill's line ... Ruddle's line ... (6)
footnotes:
1 Augusta Co., Va., Order Book 1, p. 8, cited in Lyman Chalkley, Chronicles of the Scotch Irish Settlement in Virginia (1912), v. 1, p. 14.
2 Northern Neck Land Grants, v. G, p. 393.
3 Ibid., p. 394.
4 Ibid., p. 395.
5 Ibid., p. 359. 
6 Ibid., p. 358. 

 

 

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Notes from Will of Jacob Holeman
Shenandoah County Will Book B - Page 86 - Dated October 26, 1783 

* Wife Margaret: his plantation, consisting of two tracts containing 550 acres.
* Son Daniel: plantation, consisting of 420 acres.
* Son Andrew: after Margaret dies, 400 acres of her plantation
* Son Jacob Herod: after Margaret dies, 150 acres of her plantation
* Wife, sons, and daughters (Elizabeth, Rachel, Rebecca, and Mary Ann) all received slaves.
* Executors: well beloved wife Margaret Holeman & my trusty friend Reuben More
* Witness: Samuel Miles, Thos. Lewis, Wm. Cathey 

[Note: Jacob and his wife Margaret had previously sold to Henry Houser the 395 acres he inherited from his father Daniel.]

 

 

 

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