The Carson Family

From Washington County, Virginia 
To Rockcastle County, Kentucky
To Jellico, Tennessee
To Davie, Broward County, Florida

 

 

James Holman (Holdman, Holeman)
Born: about 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky
Died: about 1886 in Crab Orchard, Lincoln County, Kentucky

 



James Holman (Holdman, Holeman) was born about 1814 in Kentucky. He lived in the area of Brodhead and Crab Orchard, Kentucky, which are on the border of three Kentucky counties: Lincoln, Garrard, and Rockcastle. (Garrard at one time was the western part of Madison County.)

On June 4, 1835 in Garrard County, Kentucky, James Holman was married to Martha Ramsey, the daughter of Alexander Ramsey, by Baptist minister Benjamin Polston. A receipt for “James Hollman and Daniel Hollman” is in the estate papers for Alexander Ramsey.

 

 

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Until the DNA results were received,  this site assumed that the most likely ancestors of James Holman, born 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky were: James Holman, born about 1770 in Rowan Co, North Carolina, and Sarah Wilson, born about 1774 in Madison Co., Kentucky. [Sarah Wilson’s mother, Catherine (Livingston) Wilson, after her first husband died, married Joseph Holman, the father of James Holman, born 1770.] James Holman, born 1770, is known to have been in Campbell County, Kentucky from 1807 through 1820.

James Holman, born 1814, is the right age and was in the right location to be a son of James Holman and Sarah Wilson. Other Holman families suspected of being the parents of James Holman, born 1814, have been ruled out: 1) The DAR mistakenly approved an application based on the assumption that the parents of James, born 1814, were Edward Holman (born December 1760 in Kent County, Maryland and died April 6, 1842 in Callaway County, Missouri) and Abigail Williams. However, the documentation was limited to the fact that the will of Edward Holman mentions a son named James. The son mentioned in Edward’s will is the James Holman, born January 26, 1799, who married Mary E. Martin. 2) Some researchers believe that the James Holman, born 1814, is the son of Daniel Holman and Rebecca Johnson. However, this was James J. Holman, born about 1809, who married Mary A. Young.


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The results of the DNA tests by FamilyTreeDNA show that these three Holmans are "very tightly related" with each other:

* James Holman (Holdman, Holeman) was born about 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky. He lived in the area of Brodhead and Crab Orchard, Kentucky, which are on the border of three Kentucky counties: Lincoln, Garrard, and Rockcastle. On June 4, 1835 in Garrard County, Kentucky, James Holman was married to Martha Ramsey, the daughter of Alexander Ramsey, by Baptist minister Benjamin Polston

* Daniel Holman who was born about 1787 in North Carolina, had children in Tennessee, and homesteaded in Douglas, Missouri.

* Kenneth Holeman who died in 1871 in Upperfreehold, Monmouth Co., New Jersey and who married Sarah "Sally" Jamison, the daughter of Henry Jamison and his wife, Margaret. Kenneth Holman is thought to be a direct descendant of the Robert Holman who left a 1709 Will in Monmouth, New Jersey.

 

The three above Holmans are "related" to, but did not descend from:

* Thomas Holeman, born about 1723 in Kent Co, Maryland, lived in Shenandoah, Virginia, moved from Virginia to North Carolina around 1750, and died 10 Jan 1798 in Wilkes County, NC. 

* Elias Holeman, born about 1759 and who died Nov 01, 1827 in Burlington County, New Jersey. [Parents unknown]

 

 

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One of the three “very tightly related” Holmans is Kenneth Holeman, died 1871 in New Jersey, who is thought to be a direct descendant of Robert Holeman, born March 1653 in Musbury, Devon, England and died June 1709 in Freehold, Monmouth County, New Jersey.
Robert HOLMAN b: Mar 1653 in Musbury, Devon, England d: Jun 1709 in Freehold, Monmouth Co., New Jersey
..+Sarah PERRINE b: 1662 in Monmouth Co., New Jersey m: 1682 in New Jersey d: 1709 in Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ
.....1 Joseph HOLMAN b: Abt. 1685 in Middletown, Monmouth Co., NJ d: Jun 1741 in Upper Freehold, Monmouth Co., NJ
.........+Thamson b: Abt. 1686 in Monmouth Co., New Jersey 
............2 Aaron HOLMAN b: Abt. 1714 in Upper Freehold, Monmouth Co., New Jersey d: 22 Mar 1782 in Windsor, Middlesex Co., NJ
................+Anne STORY b: Abt. 1720 in New Jersey m: 18 Jul 1745 in New Jersey d: Dec 1813 in Windsor, Middlesex Co., NJ
....................3 Aaron HOLMAN b: Abt. 1750 in New Jersey d: Mar 1812 in Middlesex Co., New Jersey
............2 Robert HOLMAN b: Abt. 1712 in Upper Freehold, Monmouth, New Jersey d: 1790 in Middlesex, New Jersey
................+Margaret JEMSON b: Abt. 1720 in Somerset, New Jersey
....................3 Joseph HOLMAN b: Jul 02, 1773 in New Jersey d. 1823 in Bethel, Clermont Co., Ohio
....................3 Jacob HOLMAN b: Bet. 1746–1770 d. Aft. 1809
..........................+ Eloice
............................... 4 Kenneth HOLMAN died 1871 in NJ
....................3 Hannah HOLMAN

 

 

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If Kenneth Holman is a direct descendant of the Robert Holman who left a Will in 1709 in New Jersey, then the other two “very tightly related” Holmans must also be direct descendants. The question is how did one get to be born in Kentucky and the other in North Carolina? The father of the James Holman who was born about 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky, was probably born after 1745 and died after 1815. The father of the Daniel Holman who was born about 1787 in North Carolina, had children in Tennessee, and homesteaded in Douglas County, Missouri was probably born after 1725 and died after 1785. Were Daniel and James brothers? Were they father and son?

 

Notes from
The ancestry of Grafton Johnson : with its four branches, the Johnson, the Holman, the Keen, the Morris
by Damaris Knobe



pages 76 - 77
Isaac Holeman, died 1808, moved about 1752 from Virginia to North Carolina. (undoubtedly associated with the Holeman settlement in the Shenandoah Valley)
* brought with him his parents, who are buried on his own land.
* after he moved, two of his younger brothers followed him to NC: William Holeman and James Holeman
* the three brothers had land grants in the part of Rowan County that became Davie County (adjoining plantations)
* granddaughter of William Holeman said that William's father and brother came to this country from England, before the Rev War. They separated and info on one brother unknown.

Pages 77
In addition to the three brothers above, a fourth brother - Thomas Holeman - who lived in the part of Rowan County, NC that became Surry and then Wilkes County.

Two other Holemans, if not brothers, closely related:
* Henry Holeman who migrated through NC to Kentucky (grandfather of William Steele Holman of Indiana).
* Richard Holeman who resided in Orange County, NC

Page 78
Prior to arrival of Williams grandfather and unknown brother, other Holmans:
* Thomas Holman in James City county, Va             1635
* William Holloman in Isle of Wright county, Va      1685
* Thomas Holdeman in Surry county, Va                 1714
* James Holoman in Henrico county, Va                  1722
* John Hollyman in Surry county, Va                       1724
* James Holeman in Goochland county                   1730

Pages 78 - 83
Isaac Holeman
* oldest of the three sons who went with parents from Virginia to part of Rowan County that became Davie County (adjoining plantations).
* wife: Mary
* married prior to NC
* birth estimated to be 1725
* belonged to Bear Creek Baptist Church
* Will probated May 1808
* ten years before death transferred all property to youngest sons: Jacob and David

Pages 84 - 88
William Holeman 
* next to oldest of the three sons who went with parents from Virginia to part of Rowan County that became Davie County (adjoining plantations).
* first land grant in 1786. On dividing line between Davie and Yadkin counties (and previously Rowan and Surry counties)
* served in Rev War.
* married twice: Elizabeth Johnson, Sarah Whitlock
* his sons (David Holeman and Samuel Holeman) relocated to Preble county, Ohio.

Pages 88 - 89
James Holeman
* youngest of the three sons who went with parents from Virginia to part of Rowan County that became Davie County (adjoining plantations).
* land grant 1798
* married Lucy Cook, daughter of William Cook, after he settled in NC
* was a Tory

Pages 89 - 93
Thomas Holeman
* in addition to the three brothers above, a fourth brother - Thomas- who relocated from Virginia to the part of Rowan County that became Surry and then Wilkes County.
* thought to have relocated at same time as brother Isaac - 1752.
* Holman's Ford 
* neighbor of Daniel Boone
* Will probated in 1798. Mentions wife Susannah and 14 children (eight of them had same names as children of Isaac). Absolom, Reuben, Susannah, Rachel, Joseph, Daniel, Rebecca,
Isaac, Thomas (Feb 4, 1756 - April 3, 1833. Married ___ Hawkins, Elsa ___ 1766 - abt 1873), Grace, Elizabeth, Jacob, Margaret, and James.
* widow Susannah bought property in Watauga county, NC in 1799 and sold it in 1802
* son Thomas 1756 - 1833
* son Thomas and his first wife had: 
** daughter Nancy Holeman who married a St Clair.
** daughter Margaret Holeman who was blinded in one eye by lightening strike that killed her mother.
* son Thomas' second wife was Elsa. Diana Holeman, child of Thomas and Elsa, married William Triplett.

Pages 93 - 98
Henry Holeman
* relative of four brothers mentioned above.
* lived in North Carolina, Virginia, or Maryland?
* migrated in 1776 to part of Fayette county, Kentucky that became Woodford county, Ky. (Same neighborhood as Daniel Holeman, oldest son of Isaac Holeman, died 1808.)
* killed by Indians in 1789.
* Fourteen children
* son Edward Holeman
* nephew George Holeman. Born in Maryland in 1762, moved as youth with his father to Pennsylvania, mother died, and his father placed him with his uncle Henry. 
When age 16, went with uncle Henry to Kentucky, captured by the Indians. About 1804 relocated to Indiana Territory. Died 1854
* son Jesse Lynch Holman
* sons-in-law: David Darst, Richard La Rue.
* family tradition: three brothers. One stayed in Virginia, one went north, and one went south.
* David Darst sued Col Thomas Marshal and lost over Holman land claims in Kentucky.

Pages 98 - 101
Richard Holeman  (See North Carolina Descendants)
* related to four brothers above.
* "Pioneer of North Carolina"
* relocated from "banks of the Rappahannock" in Virginia to Timberlake in the part of Orange county that became Person county, North Carolina.
* married Jean Carlisle, "full-blooded Scotch"
* son Richard. Married Margaret Daniel, granddaughter of James Daniel, one of first settlers at Jamestown. Richard died before Rev war. His widow acted as a spy for patriots.
* son Charles.
* daughter Jean. Married Isham Cates
* daughter Elizabeth (1763 - 1813). Married William Person of Warren county. His uncle was General Thomas Person.
* portrait of a great-grandson of Richard Holeman bears "striking resemblance" to a photograph of great-grandson of Isaac Holeman, and two men said they were "about third cousins".

Pages 101 - 104
Daniel Holeman
* how to connect four above brothers with Daniel Holeman of Shenandoah valley, Virginia
* as early as 1745, Daniel was on Daniel Holeman's Creek in Shenandoah county, Virginia. (appointed overseer of road)
* Daniel Holeman: three tracts, total of 945 acres, August 2, 1750
* Thomas Holeman: 428 acres, Feb 3, 1749
* Jacob Holeman: 420 acres, Feb 3, 1749
* son Jacob applied for administration of Daniel's estate in 1770. (considerable amount of personal property)
* wife Elizabeth
* daughter Rebecca Holeman, first wife of William Cathay.
* son Jacob. In 1786, disposed of the 395 acres of the 945 acres (originally granted by Thomas Lord Fairfax to Daniel Holeman who was father of Jacob).
* son Jacob's Will probated 1784. (impressive personal property)
* son Jacob's widow, Margaret, married William Cathay (widower of Daniel's daughter Rebecca).
* son Jacob's widow, Margaret sold to her son Andrew Holeman 550 acres of the 945 acres belonging to Daniel Holeman and his wife Elizabeth.
* son Jacob's Will mentions nine children: Andrew, Daniel, Jacob, Herod, Rebecca, Rachel, Mary, Ann, and Elizabeth Dobkins.
* son Jacob. sheriff, constable, tax commissioner, Justice of the Peace
* Rowan county, North Carolina and Shenandoah County, Virginia connection:
** Isaac Holeman of North Carolina called his first son Daniel and his first daughter Elizabeth.
** Isaac Holeman of North Carolina took his aged father and mother with him when he migrated from Virginia to North Carolina.
** North Carolina Holemans and Daniel's son Jacob Holeman used same names for children, except for Herod.

Pages 013 - 022
Isaac Johnson, born about 1722 (the first)
* Parents and siblings unknown.
* Started a frontier settlement in the Shenandoah valley of western Virginia about 1745.
* Established a plantation at the head of Holman Creek (north fork of Shenandoah River) in part of Augusta County that became Rockingham County.
** Surveyed Oct 26, 1749 220 acres "at the foot of North mountain on the head of Holeman's Creek" adjoining "Fairfax line".
** Surveyed Dec 9, 1754 170 acres "on the North River of the Shanando".
** Surveyed Mar 26, 1755 200 acres "on the waters of Smith Creek".
* Witness to Will of William Hill, 1748, Augusta County, Virginia
* Living nearby was a David Johnson, assumed to be a relative, who in 1751 relocated to the part of Rowan County that became Davie County, North Carolina


Second Generation

Pages 105 - 107
Daniel Holeman (b. June 20, 1750) first son of Isaac, died 1808. 
* Grew up in part of Rowan County that became Davie County.
* Land Grant: Oct 25, 1786, 520 acres, next to William Cook, part of Rowan County that became northeastern section of Iredell County.
* Married first Nancy Saunders (daughter of James and Sarah Saunders).
* Slave owner
* Relocated in 1786 to section of Virginia/Kentucky that became Woodford County, Kentucky
* Relocated in 1817 to Lincoln County, Tennessee.
* Will probated 1838. Six Children:
** Hardy Holeman, born 1774, married Elizabeth Wilson. (deceased)
** Isaac Holeman, born 1775, died abt 1835
** James Holeman, born 1777
** Sarah Holman, born 1784, married Henry Hazzard, (deceased)
** John Holman, born 1787, married Elizabeth Duval in Woodford County, Kentucky, and went to Oregon, died 1864.
** Polly Holeman, born 1789, married John Hughes.

Pages 107 - 108
Elizabeth Holeman, born about 1751 (daughter of Isaac)
* Married Isaac Johnson of Virginia.

Pages 021 - 035
Isaac Johnson (1745 - 1814), son of Isaac Johnson, the first
* born in part of Augusta County that became Rockingham County, Virginia
* Relocated to North Carolina about 1765
* Married Elizabeth Holeman (about 1751 - 1840), oldest daughter of Isaac Holeman
* Isaac and Elizabeth relocated to Rockingham county, Virginia around 1768
* From Virginia, enrolled in Rev War
* Returned in 1783 to part of Rowan County that became Davie County, NC 
* Relocated in 1790 to part of Fayette County that became Jessamine County, Kentucky. [Note: Jessamine County was created December 19, 1798 from Fayette County. It is surrounded by Woodford County, Fayette County, Madison County, Garrard County, and Mercer County.]
* His brother-in-law, Daniel Holeman (son of Isaac) was already living in part of Fayette County that became Woodford County, Kentucky.
* Will probated in Jessamine County, Kentucky in 1814.
* Son David Johnson married Polly Burch in 1792 and relocated to part of Franklin County that became Anderson County, Kentucky.
* Johnsons and Holemans living in Anderson Co., Ky claim to be related, and to descend from the Thomas Holeman who married Mary Graham.
* Living near this Thomas Holeman was a Richard Holeman who denied being a "brother".


Pages 108 - 111
Isaac Holeman, born 1757 (son of Isaac, died 1808)
* Fought in Rev War (Cowan's Ford and Guilford Courthouse)
* Married first in NC and had ten children:
** Rachael married Prather
** Elizabeth married Rowland
** Eda married Prather
** Isaac
** William
** Polly married Jacobs
** Aaron
** Moses (1794 - 1875) married first Rebecca Pactrick, second Mary Ann Veatch
** Catherine married Jerry Patrick
** Mahala married Jacob Lentz
* Married second Lillas Mitchell in 1804 in Rowan County, North Carolina and had two children:
** Andrew Mitchell Holeman (1809 - 1863) married Levina Bowman
** Matilda Holeman married John Patrick
* Relocated in 1799 to Woodford County, Kentucky and 1800 to Clark County, Indiana.
* Son: Andrew Mitchell Holeman. Grandson: Andrew Jackson Holeman

Pages 111 - 112
Patience Holeman (daughter of Isaac)
* Married James Dean
* Relocated to Jessamine County, Kentucky to be near sister Elizabeth (Holeman) Johnson. [Note: Jessamine County was created December 19, 1798 from Fayette County. It is surrounded by Woodford County, Fayette County, Madison County, Garrard County, and Mercer County.]
** Isaac Johnson relocated in 1803.
** James Dean relocated three months later.

Pages 112 - 114
Mary Holeman, born 1770 and died 1828 (daughter of Isaac)
* Married Francis Neely in 1793. Nine children.
* Neely became very wealthy. (during Rev War delivered Army horses to General Nathaniel Greene in Crab Orchard on the "Old Wilderness Road" in Kentucky)
* Daughter Mary Neely married Isaac Holeman (1800 - 1868)

Pages 114 - 116
Jacob Holeman, born 1776 and died 1842 (son of Isaac)
* Jacob and brother David acquired fathers plantation in part of Rowan County that became Davie County, NC
* Married in 1795 to Lydia Pinchbeck, daughter of John Pinchbeck and Isabella, eight children:
** John, born 1796, married Catherine Crenshaw (cousin of Mary and Nancy)
** David, born 1798 married first Nancy Crenshaw (sister of Mary) and second McGee 
** Isaac, born 1800, died 1868, married first Mary Neely, second Mary Crenshaw (sister of Nancy)
** Mary, born 1802 married Ashley Dwiggens
** Andrew, born 1804, married Sarah Booe
** Lydia, born 1806 married Thomas Ratledge
** Elizabeth, born 1808, married Thomas Smoot
** Sarah, born 1812, unmarried

Pages 114 - 120
David Holeman, born 1777, died 1851 (son of Isaac, died 1808)
* David and brother Jacob acquired fathers plantation in part of Rowan County that became Davie County, NC
* Married in 1798 Rachel Frost, daughter of Ebenezer Frost.
* Son: Ebenezer, Grandson: John Barton Holman of Roxboro, NC (shared ancestors in Maryland with William Steele Holman of Indiana?)
* David and Rachel children (12):
** Ebenezer (1805 - 1879) married Elizabeth Roby
** Lazarus
** Mary married Lispon Tuck
** Nancy married Swan
** Rachel married Solomon Stimson
** Sarah married Lovelace
** James Holeman (Sept 27, 1813 - Oct 10, 1854) unmarried
** Wilson Holeman married Elizabeth Turner
** Elizabeth married Carson Bell
** Sabre married Iva Gaither
** David
** Isaac

 


 

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The Holmans in America
concerning the descendants of Solaman Holman
Volume One
by David Emory Holman, M.D.

page xliii
Early Holmans in Virginia

* The earliest records found yet are a 1635 land grant to Thomas Holeman of James City County, Virginia.

* Unproven family tradition. Four Holman Brothers:
** sailed from England in 1607 (fleet of nine vessels with 500 people. Sea Venture got separated from others)
** spent one year in Bermuda Islands with Sir Thomas Gates who was to be Lieut. Gov. of Virginia.
** landed at Jamestown in 1610.

* James Holman of Goochland County [known as Captain James Holeman]
** married Mrs or Miss Sarah Woodward.
** land grant Feb 18, 1722
** granted state land patents (1722 - 1746) 2841 acres in Goochland County
** member of House of Burgesses (1736 - 1740)
** paid two tithables in 1835 [1735?]
** deeds 75 acres to wife Sarah (and Sarah, "his wife's eldest daughter") on June 4, 1742
** deeds 200 acres in Mannikintown on south side of James River to only son, James, in 1745
** funeral was preached June 12, 1759. (Planter and Gentleman)
** only son, James, married Jane and had seven children. James, Jr died before 1761.

* Henry Holman (brother of James) was in Goochland County in 1739. 
Will probated Aug 19, 1740. Wife named Mourning. Children: William and Sarah

* William Woodward of James City County bought 100 acres near Sarah (Woodward) Holman in 1755

* Tandy Holman was in Goochland County in 1756. Will filed 1760 in Albemarle County, Virginia.

(See Holmans in Hardin County, Kentucky)

 

 

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                                                                             Holman migratory patterns

 

As indicated above, Damaris Knobe had her own theories on how these Holman clusters connect to each other. We need more Holemen men with documented family histories to take the DNA tests. Until then, many of the relationships prior to the Thomas Holman who died about 1798 in Wilkes County, North Carolina are based on speculation. Our speculation is that:
* Some New Jersey Holmans moved down to Kent County, Maryland, probably to be near their relative, Edward Holman.
* These New Jersey Holmans while in Maryland were near the Pennsylvania border and at times were recorded as being in Pennsylvania.
* Some of these New Jersey Holmans, using The Great Valley Road (aka The Great Wagon Road) moved to Shenandoah County, Virginia.
* Some of these Shenandoah Valley Holmans continued south on the The Great Valley Road to North Carolina.
* Some of the North Carolina Holmans went directly into Eastern Tennessee.
* Some of the North Carolina Holmans went north on the The Great Valley Road to Washington County, Virginia and then went west along the Virginia-Tennessee border on Daniel Boone's The Wilderness Road. Some went through the Cumberland Gap into south-central Kentucky and Middle Tennessee. Others went through the Cumberland Gap, across the Cumberland River, and on to Madison and Woodford Counties in Kentucky. 
*Some of the Kentucky Holmans then went south into Middle Tennessee.

From New England to New Jersey
I found only one New England Holman possible connected to the three “very tightly related” Holmans -- Samuel Holman of Newport, Rhode Island. He was one of the first lot holders of Middletown, Monmouth County, New Jersey. His relationship, if any, to Robert Holman (died 1709 in Monmouth) is not apparent.


From New Jersey to Maryland
The Robert Holman who died around 1709 in New Jersey had four sons: Joseph Holman, b. 1685; Thomas, b. 1686; Robert, b. 1687; and Daniel, b. 1689. His oldest son, Joseph Holman, b. 1685 in Middletown, Monmouth Co., New Jersey inherited his property. Therefore, the children of Joseph and his wife Thamson would be expected to remain for a while in New Jersey.
It is thought that two of the younger Holman sons (Daniel b. 1689 and Thomas b. 1686) relocated to Kent County, Maryland. From about 1710 to 1735, they probably lived with the Edward Holman (1687-1743) who married Rosata VanSant. (Edward had extensive land holdings and the Maryland Archives show no land holdings for Daniel or Thomas Holman.) The early Holman family researchers identified Edward Holman of Kent County, Maryland and Daniel Holman of Shenandoah, Virginia as "cousins." [Is Edward the son of Robert, b. 1687? Is it possible that (Daniel b. 1689 and Thomas b. 1686), when they left New Jersey took with them some orphaned Holman relatives? On page 187 of the English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records compiled by Louis des Cognets, Jr. is a section called "A True and Perfect Rent Roll of the Land that is held in WARWICK COUNTY 1704" that lists under Patents out of the County "Holman Orphans   200 acres".]
Prior to relocating to Shenandoah County, did they live elsewhere in Virginia?


From Kent County, Maryland to Shenandoah, Virginia
I believe that the Holmans (Daniel b. 1689, Thomas b. 1686, Thomas, Jr. b. 1723 in Kent County, Maryland, and Isaac b. 1725 in Kent County, Maryland ) along with their slaves relocated to Shenandoah County, Virginia in 1735/36. [Was this related to the fact that Edward Holman married Rosetta Van Sandt about this time and they started their own family: Henry (born 1735), George (born 1737), and Edward, Jr., (born 1741)?] I believe that Thomas, Jr. b. 1723 probably was the son of Thomas b. 1686. Isaac b. 1725 may have been the son of Daniel b. 1689 and his first wife. Or, Isaac b. 1725 may have been the orphaned son of one of the other New Jersey Holmans.


From Shenandoah, Virginia to Wilkes County, North Carolina
Thomas Holman, Jr., born about 1723 in Kent County, Maryland, lived in Shenandoah, Virginia, and died about 1798 in Wilkes County, North Carolina. Around 1750 he sold his property in Shenandoah and relocated to Rowan County (in what was to become Surry County, and later Wilkes County), North Carolina. [Two of the children of Thomas Holeman (born about 1723 in Kent County, Maryland) and his first wife, Mary Ann Thompson married two of the children of Daniel Southerland (b. 1724 in King William County, Virginia - d. 1799 in Wilkes County, NC) and his wife Ann Margaret (married 1753 in New Hanover County, NC).]


The Holeman/Holman Newsletter reports that there was an Isaac Holeman (1725 - 1808) and his wife Mary in Rowan County (later to become Davie County), North Carolina at the same time as Thomas, Jr., Holeman (1723 - 1798). Isaac and Mary had thirteen children. [Some Holman family researchers believe Isaac is the son of the old Daniel Holman of Shenandoah. If that is correct, he would have been born in Kent County, Maryland and relocated with the Holman group to Shenandoah, Virginia. The only record I have found to show that he was part of this group is his baptism. Even though old Daniel Holman of Shenandoah died in 1770 in Shenandoah, Damaris Knobe states that in 1752 Isaac brought his parents with him to North Carolina.  If he is not the son of old Daniel Holman of Shenandoah, how does he fit into this picture?]

The three “very tightly related” Holmans are “related” to, but did not descend from the Thomas Holeman, Jr., born about 1723 in Kent Co, Maryland, lived in Shenandoah, Virginia, moved to North Carolina around 1750, and died Jan 10, 1798 in Wilkes County, North Carolina. If Isaac is a cousin, not the brother of Thomas, Jr., then there is the possibility that the
three “very tightly related” Holmans descended from Isaac.


From Wilkes County, North Carolina to Robertson County, Tennessee.
Thomas Holman, Jr., (1723 - 1798) is reported to have two wives and fourteen children. Thomas and his first wife, Mary Ann Thompson, had a son named Daniel Holeman (1750 - 1820) who relocated to Robertson County, Tennessee around 1796. Daniel Holeman b. 1750 and his wife (name unknown) had a son named Daniel. See North Carolina Descendants

From Davie County, North Carolina to Lincoln County, Tennessee
Isaac Holeman (1725-1808) and wife Mary Benton Hardy had thirteen children, including a son named, Daniel. This Daniel Holeman (1750-1836) and his wife, Nancy Ann Saunders migrated to Woodford County, Kentucky and then to Lincoln County, Tennessee.

 

From Wilkes County, North Carolina to Kentucky.
Thomas Holeman, Jr., and his first wife, Mary Ann Thompson, are presumed to have had a son named Joseph Holeman (1746 - 1819) who relocated to Madison County, Kentucky. He married his first wife in 1768 in North Carolina and is listed on the Madison County, Kentucky tax list in 1789. Thomas Holeman, Jr., lived near Daniel Boone in Wilkes County, North Carolina. It is assumed that Joseph Holeman (1746 - 1819) would follow the same path to Kentucky that Boone followed in 1775 (north to Abingdon, Virginia, through the Cumberland Gap, and following the "Wilderness Trail" to Boonsboro, Madison County, Kentucky). See North Carolina Descendants


From Kent County, Maryland to Kentucky
Edward Holman and Rosetta Van Sandt had three sons: Henry (born 1735), George (born 1737), and Edward (born 1741). Henry and Edward and the son of George (George, Jr.) in 1774 relocated to southwest Pennsylvania (an area which was also claimed by Virginia). They probably followed the same path used by Major George Washington of Virginia when in 1753 he went to Pittsburgh to object to the French expansion into the Ohio Valley. In 1776, Edward Holeman, George, Jr., and adopted son Richard Rue descended the Ohio River and settled at the mouth of Kentucky River. Because of their military service, Henry and Edward claimed land grants in 1780 in Fayette County, Kentucky, in an area that later became Woodford County, Kentucky


From New Jersey to the Ohio River Valley (both sides of the Ohio River: Mason County and Campbell County in Kentucky and Brown County and Clermont County in Ohio.) (See Van Meter/Van Metre in Kentucky Related Surnames)

Catherine Dye (1727-1780) married Francis Holeman (1724-1758), who was the brother of Robert Holman (1712-1790).  (After the death of Francis Holeman, Catherine Dye married
William Badcock.) Robert Holman (1712-1790) was the grandfather of Kenneth Holeman (one of the three “very tightly related” Holmans).
* Three of the nephews of Catherine Dye (sons of William Dye and Margaret Salter) were born in New Jersey and relocated to Mason County, Kentucky around 1790.
* Two of the nephews of Catherine Dye (sons of James Dye and Sarah Leach) were born in New Jersey and moved west, first to southwest Pennsylvania and then to Ohio. 
* Catherine Holeman (1748-1831), the daughter of Francis and Catherine (Dye) Holeman, married Peter Spencer Sunderland. Peter Sunderland was born in 1737 in Philadelphia, married Catherine Holeman in 1778 in Somerset County, New Jersey, lived in Fayette County, Pennsylvania in 1788-1790, lived in Hamilton County, Ohio in 1799, and died in 1827 in Fort Amanda, Allen County, Ohio.

Joseph Holman, born 1773 in New Jersey and died 1823 in Bethel, Clermont Co., Ohio married Eleanor Perrine (1777 - 1823) in 1797. Joseph Holeman is the brother of Jacob Holeman and the son of Robert Holeman (1712 - 1790). [Jacob Holeman is thought to be the father of Kenneth Holeman, one of the three “very tightly related” Holmans.] In 1819 or 1820 two of the sons of Joseph and Eleanor (Perrine) Holman relocated to Williamsburg, Ohio. 
* The brother of Eleanor Perrine (1777 - 1823), James Perrine (1780-1864) relocated to Clermont County, Ohio in 1803.
* The sister of Eleanor Perrine (1777 - 1823), Martha Perrine (1772 - 1849) and Martha's husband, James Isaac Dye (1770 - 1862) in 1805 emigrated to New Bethel, Ohio, but not long afterward they relocated near what is now Cold Springs, Campbell County, Kentucky. [See Madison County, Kentucky]

John Holeman was born about 1780 in New Jersey (Parents unknown). In 1803 in Burlington County, New Jersey, he married Nancy Huffman. Between 1821 and 1824, he relocated his family to Goshen Twp., in the part of Columbiana County, Ohio that is now Mahoning County. Sarah Holeman (daughter of John and Nancy (Huffman) Holeman) was born Nov 05, 1816 in Mt Holly, Burlington Co., New Jersey; married Abel Penrose Phillips in 1833 in Columbiana County, Ohio; married Ellsworth Holeman in 1874 in Mt Holly, Burlington Co., New Jersey; and died 1901 in Mt Holly, Burlington Co., New Jersey. Abel Penrose Phillips and Sarah Holeman had a son Lewis M Phillips who was born in 1839 in Covington, Campbell County, Kentucky and died in 1918 in Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio. [Covington, Kentucky is located on the west side of the Licking River at its confluence with the Ohio River, across the Ohio River from Cincinnati.]

 

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The DNA results for the descendant of James Holeman, b. 1814 in Madison Co., Kentucky, did not match the tests results in the Holman Family DNA Project for the two descendants of "German" Holmans: Conrad Holman (born before 1730 in Germany or Switzerland and died about 1771 in Amelia Township, South Carolina) and John Wendel Hallman/Heilman (born about 1710 probably in  Germany and died in South Carolina).

The DNA results for the descendant of James Holeman, b. 1814 did not match any of the tests results in the Hollyman Family DNA Project (males who are or believe they are descended from the Christopher Hollyman who resided in Isle of Wight Co., Virginia and died there in 1691). 

The DNA results for the descendant of James Holeman, b. 1814 did not match any of the tests results in the Family DNA Project for Hagelman, Hailman, Hallman, Halman, Heilman, Heilmann, Helman, Heylman, Heylmann, Hileman, Hilemann, Hilleman, Hillemann, Hillman surnames.

 

 

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Directory:

New Jersey

    Mt Holly New Jersey

    1830 Census

    1840 Census

    1850 Census

Maryland

Virginia

    Shenandoah Valley

    Virginia Related Surnames

North Carolina

    North Carolina Descendants

    North Carolina Related Surnames

Tennessee

      Tennessee Census

Missouri

Kentucky

    Madison County, Kentucky and and Garrard County

    Hardin County, Kentucky and and Grayson County

    Woodford County, Kentucky

    Clark County, Kentucky and and Estill County

   Logan County, Kentucky and and Warren County and Barren County

   Kentucky Related Surnames

Ohio River Valley

 

Joseph Holman, son of the Robert Holman who left a will in 1709 in New Jersey.

Kenneth Holman, one of the three “very tightly related” Holmans

Elias Holeman b: Abt. 1690 in Middletown, Monmouth, New Jersey, d: Jan 1748 in Upper Freehold,
Monmouth, New Jersey (Parents unknown)

 

Holman Related Surnames

    Perrine

    Cubberley

    Johnson

    Stanberry

    Southerland

   Pinchback

   Burton

   Farrar

   Snead

 

Holman Related Surnames in Kentucky:

Van Meter/Van Metre
Shapard/Shepherd/Shepperd
Payne/Paign
Farris
McNeil/Mcneil
Kennedy
Rice
Triplett
Ferguson/Farguson
Ayres

 

 

 

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